Children of Dang

For decades the region of Dang, in the southwest of Nepal, has known a slavery system in which families lived and worked on the land for board and lodging.

These people had few properties of their own, didn’t get paid a salary and didn’t receive education. The landowner could sell or swap them to – or with-  other landowners. Since 2002 this system is forbidden in Nepal and things are slowly changing for the better. However, only recently the communities have access to education. Parents are not aware of the importance of education and even now people-trafficking exist . Because of the huge poverty in this region, families see no other opportunity than to sell their children for jobs in restaurant, bars, housekeeping and the sex industry. In this way their other children can be fed.

The goals of the activities of the Nepalese Foundation Creating Possibilities Nepal is to prevent children, especially girls, to end in slavery and/or to be married off at a young age. To achieve these goals it is highly important to include parents in these activities. Through Reach Out Too Foundation we support tens of children and their mothers. For example these children (especially girls) receive school uniforms, the education cost are refunded and if necessary extra support is given through providing a bike or by tutoring.Next to this, the mothers of these children are obliged to actively join a Self Help Group. In these groups, mothers receive simple training on – for example – hygiene or to start a small business for generating a higher income for supporting their children themselves in a few years from now.

Creating Possibilities Nepal is fully led by Nepalese people. By supporting a local foundation the best available knowledge is guaranteed for solving local cultural problems. They better understand the background of the problems and how to solve these problems. On an earlier stage they become aware on where things could go wrong and they are more trusted by the local communities.

Soenita by Daniel Maissan